Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

March 21st : Waseskun

Posted: March 2, 2018 by admin in Uncategorized

Facebook Event

February 28: Blackout Day

Posted: February 25, 2017 by admin in Uncategorized


Black History Month has recognized the heritage, accomplishments, and culture of black people both past and present. But as this celebration comes to a close, it is important to address the ongoing challenges and injustice that the black community now collectively faces.

Join Ethnocultural Support Services at Western University, UWO Black Students’ Association, Muslim Students’ Association – Western Universityand Prisoners’ Justice Film Festival: London, On for #TheBlackout on Tuesday, February 28th. This is a day-long event dedicated to addressing pressing issues that affect the black community. This includes topics such as mass incarceration, police brutality, Black Lives Matter vs. All Lives Matter, AIDS in the black community and systemic racism. Come by the UCC atrium and learn more about these topics!

Facebook: Blackout Day: Black History Month Closing Ceremonies

BLACK LIVES MATTER ATRIUM DAY
– ALL DAY

HIV/AIDS VOLUNTEERING in UCC Atrium
– 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM

BLACK LIVES MATTER SPEAKER SERIES in UCC Atrium
– 6 PM – 7.30 PM

SCREENING OF DOCUMENTARY “13TH” BY AVA DUVERNAY
– 7.30 PM – 9 PM – Council Chambers, 3rd floor UCC

 

March 23rd: The Prison in Twelve Landscapes

Posted: February 18, 2017 by admin in Uncategorized


Prisoners’ Justice Film Festival presents: The Prison in Twelve Landscapes
Presented in partnership with the London Ontario Media Arts Association (LOMAA)
March 23rd from 6:30pm – 9:30pm in the Kenny Theatre.
Facebook: The Prison in Twelve Landscapes

More people are imprisoned in the United States at this moment than in any other time or place in history, yet the prison itself has never felt further away or more out of sight. The Prison in Twelve Landscapes is a film about the prison in which we never see a penitentiary. Instead, the film unfolds as a cinematic journey through a series of landscapes across the USA where prisons do work and affect lives, from a California mountainside where female prisoners fight raging wildfires, to a Bronx warehouse full of goods destined for the state correctional system, to an Appalachian coal town betting its future on the promise of prison jobs.

There will also be a panel discussion with Q&A after the screening.

Established in 2012, London Ontario Media Arts Association (LOMAA) is an emerging non-profit, artist-run collective that focuses on providing underrepresented groups and individuals with resources, exhibition opportunities and support. LOMAA is committed to fostering regional media arts through dynamic programming that shares contemporary and historical Canadian and international artists with the London community. http://www.lomaa.ca/

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The festival takes place on the ancestral lands of the Haudenosaunee, Anishinaabek, Lenape, Huron-Wendat, and Attawandaron Peoples. All events are free (donations welcome), wheelchair accessible, and scent-reduced—please do not use or wear scented products, including essential oils. We will be continuing to update the information on this event page and our website. Please contact us (PJFFLondon@gmail.com) with any questions.

March 16th: Beyond the Wall

Posted: February 18, 2017 by admin in Uncategorized

Prisoners’ Justice Film Festival presents: Beyond the Wall
March 16th from 6:30pm – 9:30pm in the Kenny Theatre.
Facebook:Beyond the Wall

Beyond the Wall highlights one of the most critical issues in criminal justice reform—the flood of prisoners returning to our streets and communities each year where they face tremendous challenges and barriers. The film follows five formerly incarcerated men who are attempting to rebuild their lives on the outside with little support from the U.S. criminal justice system. Through this compelling and personal account, the film vividly shows their struggles and strategies for survival beyond the walls of jail and prison.

There will also be a panel discussion with Q&A after the screening.

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The festival takes place on the ancestral lands of the Haudenosaunee, Anishinaabek, Lenape, Huron-Wendat, and Attawandaron Peoples. All events are free (donations welcome), wheelchair accessible, and scent-reduced—please do not use or wear scented products, including essential oils. We will be continuing to update the information on this event page and our website. Please contact us (PJFFLondon@gmail.com) with any questions.

March 9th: Peace, Propaganda & the Promised Land

Posted: February 18, 2017 by admin in Uncategorized


Prisoners’ Justice Film Festival presents: Peace, Propaganda & the Promised Land
Presented in partnership with the Solidarity Film Coalition and Cinema Politica
March 9th from 6:30pm – 9:30pm in the Kenny Theatre.
Facebook:Peace, Propaganda & the Promised Land

Peace, Propaganda & the Promised Land provides a striking comparison of U.S. and international media coverage of the crisis in the Middle East, zeroing in on how structural distortions in U.S. coverage have reinforced false perceptions of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. This pivotal documentary exposes how the foreign policy interests of American political elites–oil, and a need to have a secure military base in the region, among others–work in combination with Israeli public relations strategies to exercise a powerful influence over how news from the region is reported.

There will be a panel discussion with Q&A after the screening.

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The festival takes place on the ancestral lands of the Haudenosaunee, Anishinaabek, Lenape, Huron-Wendat, and Attawandaron Peoples. All events are free (donations welcome), wheelchair accessible, and scent-reduced—please do not use or wear scented products, including essential oils. We will be continuing to update the information on this event page and our website. Please contact us (PJFFLondon@gmail.com) with any questions.

March 10th: Fundraiser!!

Posted: March 4, 2016 by admin in Uncategorized

Fundraiser
Prisoner’s Justice Film Festival Fundraiser
Thursday, March 10th at 6pm at Winks Eatery (551 Richmond St)

Join us for a fundraiser at Winks Eatery where we will be raffling off some amazing prizes and enjoying some spoken word artists and musicians.

https://www.facebook.com/events/1564782860503960/

Can’t make it?

Buy a T-shirt to support the PJFF!
https://teespring.com/PJFFLondon

Or, want to donate and get a cool gift? Check out the perks for your donation at:
https://www.generosity.com/community-fundraising/prisoners-justice-film-festival-speakers-fund–2

March 23rd: Islamophobia

Posted: March 1, 2016 by admin in Uncategorized

informants
Wednesday, March 23rd at 6:30 pm 

Joanne & Peter Kenny Theatre at King’s College on 266 Epworth Ave.

Prisoners’ Justice Film Festival and the Department of Theology will be screening the film:

Informants by Al Jazeera
https://www.facebook.com/events/1709035419352715/

The Prisoners’ Justice Film Festival presents the screening of the Al Jazeera documentary, FBI Informants.

About the Documentary:
The Federal Bureau of Investigation is the largest collector of human intelligence in the United States.

On any given day, the FBI has a network of more than 15,000 informants collecting information. Many of the FBI’s informants work in US Muslim communities.

These informants are part of a post-9/11 mandate to stop potential attacks before they even begin — a preemptive counterterrorism policy.

To find suspects interested in committing violence in the United States, the FBI assigns informants to pose as members of al-Qaeda, or one of its affiliate groups, and then offer up the opportunity to get involved in a plot.

During the course of this investigation, Al Jazeera met some of the men who spied on US communities on orders from the FBI.

Al Jazeera’s Investigative Unit tracked down three informants, all with different methods and motivations, and reveals new details about their undercover work for the US government.

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Following the screening, Imam Yasin Dwyer and Dr. Ingrid Mattson will shed light on the rise of Islamophobia in Canada as well as the high incarceration rates and the radicalization of Muslims in Canadian prisons.

About the speakers:

Imam Yasin Dwyer was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba to parents from Jamaica. He has served as a faith-based chaplain with the Correctional Service of Canada for the past 12 years. Imam Yasin sits on the board of the Montreal based Silk Road Institute. He also works as a chaplain at Queen’s University and lectures extensively on traditional Islamic spirituality, Black culture and the history of Muslims in the West.

Dr. Ingrid Mattson is a scholar of Islamic Studies, an expert in interfaith relations and a Muslim religious leader. Since 2012 she has held the London and Windsor Community Chair in Islamic Studies at Huron University College in London, Canada. Previously she was Professor of Islamic Studies at Hartford Seminary (CT) where she developed and directed the first accredited graduate program for Muslim chaplains in America. From 2001-2010 Dr. Mattson was elected and served as vice-president, then as president, of the Islamic Society of North America (USA). Her writings focus on Qur’anic Studies, theological ethics and interfaith engagement. Dr. Mattson is a Senior Fellow of the Royal Aal al-Bayt Institute for Islamic Thought in Amman, Jordan and has served on many boards, including the Interfaith Taskforce of the White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships, the Council of Global Leaders of the C-100 of the World Economic Forum and the Leadership Group of the U.S.-Muslim Engagement Project.

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The festival takes place on the ancestral lands of the Haudenosaunee, Anishinaabek, Lenape, Huron-Wendat, and Attawandaron Peoples. All events are free (donations welcome), wheelchair accessible, and scent-reduced—please do not use or wear scented products, including essential oils. We will be continuing to update the information on this event page and our website. Please contact us (PJFFLondon@gmail.com) with any questions.

 

morethanaplace

Location: now 266 Epworth Ave, King’s University College, Wemple Building, Room 175

Time: 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Prisoners’ Justice Film Festival and People First of London presents: The “Freedom Tour”

https://www.facebook.com/events/960660724024903/

Full ASL translation will be available
The film will be close-captioned
Our location is physically accessible, including accessible washrooms
Active Listeners will be present to offer support to those who find they need it during the film and afterwards
We are unfortunately unable to offer childcare and so we apologize to all those who this may inconvenience

Description: This section features the powerful documentary, “The Freedom Tour”, which follows the journey of activists fighting to close down institutions for people diagnosed with intellectual disabilities.  The documentary is created by People First of Canada, an activist group that consists of people labeled with intellectual disabilities who push back against the oppressive systems that have marginalized them from the rest of society. As their website states, “We see ourselves as people first, and as people who have taken back control of our lives from families, policy makers and professionals such as support workers, doctors, social workers, and others, who, for far too long, made decisions for us.”

–People First of Canada
The documentary follows a group of activists with intellectual disabilities in their travels across the country to interview current residents and survivors of residential institutions.  While the documentary does not focus on people who have been convicted of crimes and incarcerated, the segment is an important piece that demonstrates the ways in which the prison industrial complex works on multiple levels. This includes the institutionalization, segregation, silencing, devaluation, and invisibilization of people  with disabilities who have historically been deemed unworthy and incapable of living “productive” lives in our society and who continue to face and resist these dangerous assumptions and the practices that perpetuate inequality.The film will be introduced at 1:00 pm by People First members who helped make the film and will be followed by a brief break.
Following the break, around 2:25 pm, for those who wish to stay we will be having a discussion about the ongoing de-institutionalization efforts across Canada and the ongoing effects of the institutional thinking that continues alive and well in society and perpetuates the marginalization of people diagnosed with disabilities through prisons, nursing homes, psychiatric units, long-term care facilities, and many other ways.
Warning: The Freedom Tour deals with a lot of difficult themes including institutional abuse, sexual abuse, solitary confinement, and suicide, among others. If you have ever lived in an institution or are connected with anyone who has, you may find this a difficult watch. While all are welcome, if you feel this showing is not right for you, we nonetheless welcome anyone who wants to attend the discussion portion only to participate in the conversation about ongoing institutionalization in Canada.
To view the Trailer of the Freedom Tour:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=13y4BI0Lets&feature=youtu.be

majorSaturday, March 19th at 7pm

Spencer Engineering Building, Room SED 2202, Western University

Prisoners’ Justice Film Festival, PLFAG London and the Department of Women’s Studies and Feminist Research at UWO presents: Miss Major

Description:

The Prisoners’ Justice Film Festival, PGLAG London and the Department of Women’s Studies and Feminist Research at UWO are thrilled to announce that we will be screening MAJOR at our 4th annual PJFF.
https://www.facebook.com/events/1696202053952085/

MAJOR! is a documentary film exploring the life and campaigns of Miss Major Griffin-Gracy, a formerly incarcerated Black transgender elder and activist who has been fighting for the rights of trans women of color for over 40 years.

Miss Major is a veteran of the Stonewall Rebellion and a survivor of Attica State Prison, a former sex worker, an elder, and a community leader and human rights activist. She is simply “Mama” to many in her community. If history is held within us, embodied in our loves and losses, then Miss Major is a living library, a resource for generations to come to more fully understand the rich heritage of the Queer Rights movement that is so often whitewashed and rendered invisible. Miss Major’s personal story and activism for transgender civil rights intersects LGBT struggles for justice and equality from the 1960s to today. Miss Major is currently the executive director of the San Francisco-based Transgender Gender Variant Intersex Justice Project (TGIJP), advocating for trans women of color in and outside of prison. MAJOR! is more than just a biographical documentary: It’s an investigation into critical issues of how the Prison Industrial Complex represents a wide-spread and systematic civil rights violation, as well as a historical portrait of diverse LGBT communities, told with love and humor, and personalized through the lens of a vibrant and charismatic woman.

Here is a link to the trailer Miss Major: http://www.missmajorfilm.com/

MAJOR! official trailer from StormMiguel Florez on Vimeo.